Assignment 3 - long. If each house uses a maximum of 50...

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Homework 3 ChE 354 3 Problems Prof. Poehl 1. In the jet ejector pump shown below, a high speed stream (Qa) is injected at a rate of 50 GPM through a small tube 1 in. ID into a stream (Qb) in a larger 3 in. ID tube. The energy and momentum are transferred from the small stream to the large stream which causes an increase in the total stream pressure. The fluids come in contact at the end of the small tube and are perfectly mixed in a short distance downstream (the flow is turbulent). The energy dissipated in the system is significant, but the wall force between the small tube and the point where mixing is complete can be neglected. If both streams are water at 60 F and Qb is 100 GPM, calculate the pressure rise caused by the ejector pump. 2. A water tower that is 90 ft. high provides water to a residential subdivision. The water line from the tower to the subdivision is 6 in. Sch. 40 steel pipe 3 miles
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Unformatted text preview: long. If each house uses a maximum of 50 gal/hr (at peak demand) and the pressure in the distribution system is not to be less than 30 psig at any point, how many homes can be served by the water main? Ignore losses due to fittings and expansion/contractions. FYI: Most subdivisions have between 140-160 houses. 3. You are selecting a pump that will be used to move sludge in a waste stream. In the lab, you measure the viscosity of the sludge and conclude that it can be described as a power law fluid with a flow index of 0.45, a viscosity of 7 poise at a shear rate of 1/sec, and a density of 1.2 g/cc. This is to travel through a 3 inch Sch. 40 pipeline 1000 feet long at a flow rate of 100 GPM. What is the required horsepower of the pump?...
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course CHE 353 taught by Professor Poehl during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas at Austin.

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