{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

Chapter 5 - Rhetoric Rationalization and Bad Argument...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–11. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Rhetoric, Rationalization, and Bad Argument Strategies Informal Fallacies and Non-arguments
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Argument from Outrage When anger functions as a premise May use selective presentation to attempt to create, increase, or confirm feelings of anger
Background image of page 2
Argument from Outrage When anger functions as a premise May use selective presentation to attempt to create, increase, or confirm feelings of anger May attempt to justify letting anger over one thing influence judgment about another, unrelated thing
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Argument from Outrage When anger functions as a premise May use selective presentation to attempt to create, increase, or confirm feelings of anger May attempt to justify letting anger over one thing influence judgment about another, unrelated thing May simplistically attempt to focus anger on an easy target (scapegoating) “Midnight basketball? Those liberals never quit!!!”
Background image of page 4
Scare Tactics/Argument by Force When fear functions as a premise May use selective presentation to attempt to create, increase, or confirm feelings of fear
Background image of page 5

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Scare Tactics/Argument by Force When fear functions as a premise May use selective presentation to attempt to create, increase, or confirm feelings of fear May attempt to justify letting fear of one thing influence judgment about another, unrelated thing
Background image of page 6
Scare Tactics/Argument by Force When fear functions as a premise May use selective presentation to attempt to create, increase, or confirm feelings of fear May attempt to justify letting fear of one thing influence judgment about another, unrelated thing Depends on inappropriate beliefs about what is feared
Background image of page 7

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Argument from Pity When sympathy functions as a premise Occurs primarily as self-deception
Background image of page 8
Argument from Pity When sympathy functions as a premise Occurs primarily as self-deception May make calculated demands on feelings of sympathy and compassion
Background image of page 9

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Argument from Pity When sympathy functions as a premise Occurs primarily as self-deception
Background image of page 10
Image of page 11
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.
  • Spring '08
  • CurtisPeldo
  • Scapegoating, selective presentation, Popularity/ Tradition/Common Practice, potentially relevant facts

{[ snackBarMessage ]}