chapter 2 - 8th edition Steven P. Robbins Mary Coulter 1...

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1 Steven P. Robbins Mary Coulter
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2 L E A R N I N G  O U T L I N E  1. Explain how we use scientific  management today 2. Explain how we use general  administrative theory today 3. Discuss how we use the  quantitative approach today 4. Explain the contributions of the  Hawthorne and Asch Studies 5. Discuss how we use the  behavioral approach today 6. Describe an organization using  the systems approach 7. Discuss how the systems  approach and CAS theory helps  us understand how to   management in complex,  changing environments 1. Explain how the contingency  approach differs from the early  management theories and how  it is appropriate for studying  management 2. Describe the current trends  and issues facing managers
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3 Historical Background of  Management Early evidence of management Great Wall of China Pyramids Theory of division of labor Adam Smith  Wealth of Nations, 1776 Industrial Revolution  Changed focus of human labor (interchangable parts, assembly lines) Created large organizations  in need of management
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4 Major Management Theories Scientific Management General Administrative  Theorists Quantitative Approach Organizational Behavior Contingency Approach Systems Approach
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5 Scientific Management  Fredrick Winslow Taylor  (1911) Using scientific methods to  define the “one best way” for a  job to be done: Right person on job Correct tools and equipment Standardized method Economic incentives “Pig iron experiment” Increased  iron loaded/day from12 to 48 tons
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6 Taylor’s Five Principles of Management 1. Develop a science for each element  of an individual’s work 2. Scientifically select and then train,  teach, and develop the worker 3. Cooperate with workers to ensure  all work is done according to plan 4. Divide work and responsibility  almost equally between  management and workers 5. Management takes over all work for  which it is better fitted than the  workers
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7 Scientific Management  Frank and Lillian Gilbreth  (early 1900s) Increasing worker productivity  by reducing wasted motion Example: bricklayers –  reduced number of motions  from 18 to 5 Cheaper by the Dozen
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8 Scientific Management How Do we use today? Use time and motion studies to  increase productivity Hire the best qualified employees Design output-based incentives Video:  Pajama Game Task oriented
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9 General Administrative Theorists Max Weber  (early 1900s ) Theory of authority based  on an ideal type of  organization  (bureaucracy) Rationality Predictability Impersonality Technical competence Authoritarianism
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10 Exhibit 2.4 Exhibit 2.4 Weber’s Ideal Bureaucracy
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chapter 2 - 8th edition Steven P. Robbins Mary Coulter 1...

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