tCH 3.1 - Review • The periodic table • Periodic trends...

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Unformatted text preview: Review • The periodic table • Periodic trends • Metals, metalloids, nonmetals, transition metals • Begin Chapter 3 now • 1) I finished homework 1 and 2 before yesterday • 2) I finished homework 1 and 2 just before class today • 3) I forgot to do the homework Early advances in Chemistry • Democritus– originator of the idea of atoms ▫ From the greek word atomos – not cut • Lavoisier– accepted the idea of atoms and elements and came up with compounds 460 - 370 B.C. 460 - 370 B.C. 1743 - 1794 1743 - 1794 Law of mass consevation • There is no detectable change in the total mass of materials when they react chemically to form new materials • Matter is neither created nor destroyed in a chemical reaction Lavoisier’s experiments • When you burn wood the ash takes up much less space than the wood originally did. • But the law of mass conservation tells us that the mass of the products of this reaction must equal the original mass, so where is the missing mass? The law of definite proportions • Elements combine in definite mass ratios to form compounds • Ex. ▫ In the production of water it is know that oxygen combines with hydrogen in a mass ratio of 8:1 e or you need 8 g of oxygen for every 1 g hydrogen • Practice (refer to fig 3.7) If you have 16 g of oxygen and 2 g of hydrogen how many grams of H 2 O can you make? 1)16 2)18 3)20 4)9 • What if you have 24g of oxygen and 2 grams of H? ▫ 1) 26 g ▫ 2) 22g ▫ 3) 18g ▫ 4) 16g Dalton’s atomic theory • 1. Each element consists of indivisible, minute particles called atoms • 2. Atoms can be neither created nor destroyed in chemical reactions • 3. All atoms of a given element are identical • 4. Atoms chemically combine in definite whole- number ratios to form compounds • 5. Atoms of different elements have different masses Dalton’s atomic theory • 1. Each element consists of indivisible, minute particles called atoms • 2. Atoms can be neither created nor destroyed in chemical reactions • 3. All atoms of a given element are identical • 4. Atoms chemically combine in definite whole-4....
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course CHEM 1305 taught by Professor Mason during the Spring '08 term at Texas Tech.

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tCH 3.1 - Review • The periodic table • Periodic trends...

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