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tCH 9.1 - Relative Mass We know atoms react in whole number...

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Relative Mass We know atoms react in whole number ratios  with one another Ex  C (s)  + O 2(g)         CO 2(g) For the reaction to work you need 1 carbon atom  for every 1 oxygen molecule
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Since atoms and molecules are so small we need  to react millions and millions of each to form a  noticeable amount of product Let’s look at some non atom examples
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So an equal number of ping pong balls will  weigh 1/20 th  of an equal number of golf balls. Problem: Red jelly beans weigh twice as much as pink  ones.  If you want an equal number of each and  you need 10g of the pink ones, how many grams  must you get of the red ones?
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Atoms and Molecules Replace the jelly beans with atoms now. We know we need an equal amount of  carbon  atoms and oxygen molecules   to make carbon  dioxide So how do we know the weight of a single  carbon atom and two oxygen atoms?
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1 carbon  atom  per 2 oxygen  atoms Gives us CO 2
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