13 Introduction to EMG - Computer Introduction to EMG 13 An electromyogram or EMG is a graphical recording of electrical activity within muscles

13 Introduction to EMG - Computer Introduction to EMG 13 An...

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Human Physiology with Vernier 13 - 1 Computer 13 Introduction to EMG An electromyogram, or EMG, is a graphical recording of electrical activity within muscles. Activation of muscles by nerves results in changes in ion flow across cell membranes, which generates electrical activity. This can be measured using surface electrodes placed on the skin over the muscle of interest. Electrical activity correlates with strength of muscle contraction, and is dependent on the quantity of nerve impulses which are sent to the muscle. This is easily visible in large muscles such as the biceps muscle in the arm and the quadriceps muscle in the leg, but can also be demonstrated in smaller, less visible muscles, such as the masseter muscle in the jaw. Temporomandibular Disorders, TMD, result from problems in the temporomandibular (jaw) joint, and affect jaw action (chewing of food, talking, playing the trumpet). In this experiment, you will examine the electrical activity generated by chewing and see how food texture influences the strength of contraction in the masseter muscle of the jaw (see Figure 1). Important: Do not attempt this experiment if you suffer from pain in or around the jaw. Inform your instructor of any possible health problems that might be exacerbated if you participate in this exercise. OBJECTIVES In this experiment, you will Obtain graphical representation of the electrical activity of a muscle. Associate amount of electrical activity with strength of muscle contraction. Compare masseter muscle function during different types of chewing activity.
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  • Winter '15
  • Pfluegel
  • Biology, life science, 23L, LS , UCLA, Pfluegl, electrical activity, Jaw, masseter muscle, Temporomandibular joint disorder

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