Feudalism in the Holy Roman Empire.txt - Banner logo Submit...

This preview shows page 1 - 3 out of 10 pages.

Banner logoSubmit your science photographs and media files to the Wiki Science Competition!HideFeudalism in the Holy Roman EmpireFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to navigationJump to searchThis article needs additional citations for verification. Please help improve thisarticle by adding citations to reliable sources. Unsourced material may bechallenged and removed.Find sources: "Feudalism in the Holy Roman Empire" – news · newspapers · books ·scholar · JSTOR (August 2018) (Learn how and when to remove this template message)Feudalism in the Holy Roman Empire was a politico-economic system of relationshipsbetween liege lords and enfeoffed vassals (or feudatories) that formed the basis ofthe social structure within the Holy Roman Empire during the High Middle Ages. InGermany the system is variously referred to Lehnswesen, Feudalwesen orBenefizialwesen.[citation needed]Feudalism in Europe emerged in the Early Middle Ages, based on Roman clientship andthe Germanic social hierarchy of lords and retainers. It obliged the feudatory torender personal services to the lord. These included e. g. holding his stirrup,joining him on festive occasions and service as a cupbearer at the banquet table.Both pledged mutual loyalty: the lord to "shelter and protect", the vassal to "helpand advise". Furthermore, feudal lord and vassal were bound to mutually respect oneanother, e.g. the lord could not, by law, beat his vassal, humiliate or lay handson his wife or daughter.[citation needed]The highest liege lord was the sovereign, the king or duke, who granted fiefs tohis princes. In turn, they could award fiefs to other nobles, who wanted to beenfeoffed by them and who were often subordinate to the liege lord in thearistocratic hierarchy.Contents1Terms1.1Types2Feudal system3Roots of feudalism3.1Roman patronage3.2Germanic clan system3.3Emergence of feudal relationships3.4Subsequent development4Important principles of feudal law in the Holy Roman Empire4.1Feoffment4.2Legal relationship between lords and vassals4.3Inheritance and alienation of church land4.4Dissolution of a feudal relationship5Summary6Family, house and place names7See also8References9Literature10External linksTermsGötz von Berlichingen was enfeoffed with Hornberg Castle in this deedA fief (also fee, feu, feud, tenure or fiefdom, German: Lehen, Latin: feudum,
feodum or beneficium) was understood to be a thing (land, property), which itsowner, the liege lord (Lehnsherr), had transferred to the hereditary ownership ofthe beneficiary on the basis of mutual loyalty, with the proviso that it wouldreturn to the lord under certain circumstances.Enfeoffment gave the vassal extensive, hereditary usufruct of the fief, founded andmaintained on a relationship of mutual loyalty between the lord and thebeneficiary. The Latin word beneficum implied, not only the actual estate orproperty, the fief - in Latin usually called the feodum - but also the associatedlegal relationship.[citation needed]

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

End of preview. Want to read all 10 pages?

Upload your study docs or become a

Course Hero member to access this document

Term
Fall
Professor
N/A

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture

  • Left Quote Icon

    Student Picture