Unit 2 Notes-1 - Greek Art Proper 1. Three general phases...

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Unformatted text preview: Greek Art Proper 1. Three general phases in Proper Greek Art a. Geometric Period (800 – 600 BCE) b. Archaic Period (600 – 480 BCE) c. Classical Period (480 – 323 BCE) i.Hellenistic (323 – on) 2. Major point in Greek art: how fast it changes; opposite of Egyptian art a. From stiff and rigid to discus thrower in only 150 years. Able to see some changes in as little as 25 years b. In the beginning Greek art is under the influence of the Egyptians but it rapidly shakes it off and becomes much more realistic Pottery 1. Can be broken but hard to destroy the shards 2. Dipylon Amphora 152PAGE. a. Dipylon Cemetery; 750 BCE; 61 inches high b. Amphora: held liquids; had a hole in the bottom i.Pot was placed over the grave as a grave marker and liquid could seep out from the bottom and anoint the grave c. Called Geometric Period because of the design: Greek fret d. Body: scene of a funeral i.Typical stylized people; deceased lying horizontal ii.Image matches the purpose: lots of funerary images e. Lots of registers: lots of Egyptian influence i.Moves away from Egyptian influence later on 3. Greek fret convention: horizontal on neck, vertical on body (near the handles) 4. Unknown Vase a. 8 th century; 42 inches high b. Funeral scene on top with Greek fret i.Elaborate funeral place for deceased ii.Standardized people: hands up in mourning iii. Lots of imagery: shields 5. Why are vases so important? a. No other form of surviving painting. We know they had them but the paintings/buildings were destroyed 6. Odysseus Blinding Polyphemos and Fighting Animals and Gorgons Amphora a. Eleusis (north of Athens); 7 th century; 56 inches high b. Orientalizing part of the Geometric Period c. Amphora: Geometric/Orientalizing d. No more registers only a century later e. Body: i.Gorgons: snake-haired women; fighting animals ii. Floral decorations is what makes it orientalizing 1. Has nothing to do with the scene; design from the Near East f. Neck: i.Story from Odyssey 1. Stories from Homer were a major iconography in Greek Art 2. Gods NOT kings/rulers were prominent figures in Greek Art ii.Odysseus stabs stick in the eye of Polyphemos (Cyclops) 1. Odysseus is a different color from the other men 2. Stylized men; still decorative images Sculpture 1. End of Geometric Period 2. Lady of Auxerre a. 650 BCE; limestone; 2 feet high b. Still has Egyptian influence: i.Feet close together; geometric hair and skirt; blocky and unmoving 3. Kore: female statue 4. Kouros: male statue 5. Main point: move away from the Egyptian influence Archaic Period 1. Lots of marble in Greece 2. After 600 BCE: large, nude males; females remain clothed 3. Slight smile: archaic smile a. Even when they’re dying; goes away in the Classical Period b. Unknown smile; could be Egyptian influence 4. Statues were painted 5. Kouros of Sounion: a. Sounion (south of Athens); 600 BCE; marble; 10 feet high 6. Anavyssos Kouros a. Anavyssos; 525 BCE; 6’4”; marble b. Grave marker means that it may have been the common use for the other...
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This note was uploaded on 04/14/2008 for the course ART HISTOR Dont know taught by Professor Goode during the Fall '07 term at University of Texas at Dallas, Richardson.

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Unit 2 Notes-1 - Greek Art Proper 1. Three general phases...

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