Stylistic Features - Stylistic Features A Glossary Higher...

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S tylistic F eatures A Glossary © Higher Results Consultancy, 1998 A B C D E F H I L M O P R S T V W Alliteration: e.g. The silken ship sailed silently through the sea. (Here the "s" sound is helping to reinforce the silence and the smooth grace of the ship's passage through the sea.) Poets are very fond of alliteration but look out for it also in newspaper headlines. Allusion: a reference, sometimes indirect, to a person, place, theory etc. which the reader is assumed to have some knowledge of. e.g. a Biblical allusion with which the reader is assumed to be familiar. Anecdote: a short story used to illustrate a point, often used by writers as a way of introducing their topic. Analogy: a parallel case with one or more points of resemblance. This is often used by writers to help the reader to understand a complex or abstract point Audience: the readership whom the writer is addressing, the people who are being targeted by the article. e.g. young people, the elderly, an intelligent, sophisticated and articulate readership etc. Bathos: anti-climax, designed to shock or amuse. e.g. " The Queen stepped graciously out of her gleaming limousine, walked up the red carpet in suitably regal style--then gave a huge yawn, bored with the day's proceedings." (The reader has been built up to expect one type of serious, ceremonial atmosphere but this anticipation is deflated with reference to the yawn.) Brackets: these are for extra information (an aside, sometimes humorous etc.) which is clearly not part of the main statement. They are used for the same purpose as a pair of commas but are more decisive. Cliche: a stereotyped expression which is overused e.g. "the dawn of a new era". Coin an expression: to invent a new word or phrase to suit the context. Colloquialism: word or phrase chiefly found in everyday speech, as opposed to writing. The use of colloquialism is one of the hallmarks of an informal style of writing. e.g. "kids" for children or "magic" for wonderful. Colon: separates two clauses/sentence structures that are of equal importance and
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are related to each other. e.g. Spring is green: Autumn is gold. It is used after a general statement before a list of examples: e.g. The world is full of challenges: climbing mountains, exploring the oceans, discovering new ideas. Command: This gives a sense of urgency, requiring action from others. e.g. Do this! Comma: this cuts off one clause from another. It separates items on a list.. As a pair, it acts as parenthesis, separating added information, asides, non essential extras etc. from the main sentence. The placement of a comma can alter the emphasis placed on a word or phrase.
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