Elbin.ENG125.Wk5.Assign - Running head COMPARISON 1 A Comparison of Two Poems Interpretation of Death Nicole Elbin ENG 125 Leah Hamilton COMPARISON 2 A

Elbin.ENG125.Wk5.Assign - Running head COMPARISON 1 A...

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Running head: COMPARISON 1 A Comparison of Two Poems’ Interpretation of Death Nicole Elbin ENG 125 Leah Hamilton October 27, 2014
COMPARISON 2 A COMPARISON TWO POEMS’ INTERPRETATION OF DEATH Does everyone not recoil when thinking of death, or at least mostly everyone? Nevertheless, people have different interpretations of the notion of dying. When examining the poems “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson and “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas one can see the comparative and contrasting techniques used to offer their individual views of death. Emily Dickinson’s poem “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” displays the concept of accepting death, while Dylan Thomas’ poem “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” displays the concept of resistance or refusal of death. Both of the poets use point of view, and figurative language, like alliteration, personification, symbolism, and metaphors, in similar ways, but the rhyming, setting, form, and meter in both poems are very different while exploring their contrasting thoughts relating to the idea of death. Although both poems have the same overall theme of death, both poets have presented two very different perspectives on the subject. Alliteration is seen throughout both “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” and “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night”. When looking at “Do Not Go Gentle Into That Good Night” by Dylan Thomas, one can see that there is alliteration in the title and the very first line “Do not go gentle into that good night” (as cited in Clugston, 2014) with the sound that the n makes in the beginning of the words “not” and “night” and in the middle of the words “gentle” and “into,” also in the hard g sound at the beginning of “go” and “good.” A few other examples of alliteration in the poem are the words “deeds” and “danced” in the line “Their frail deeds might have danced in a green bay” (as cited in Clugston, 2014) and the words “blind,” “blaze,” and “be” in the line “Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay” (as cited in Clugston, 2014).
COMPARISON 3 Then, if you look at “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” by Emily Dickinson, you will see that there is alliteration throughout it also. In the first line of the second stanza “We slowly drove, he knew no haste” (as cited in Clugston, 2014), the n sound in the words “knew” and “no” along with the l sound in the words “labor” and “leisure” from the third line “My labor, and my leisure too” (as cited in Clugston, 2014) are all examples of the use of alliteration in this poem. The alliteration is seen all throughout this poem, down to the second to last line “I first surmised the horses’ heads” (as cited in Clugston, 2014) with the words “horses” and “heads.” Both poets use some type of personification in their poems. In Emily Dickinson’s “Because I Could Not Stop for Death” she does a beautiful job of personifying death. With the

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