The American Revolution and Confederation

The American - The American Revolution and Confederation 1774-1787 The First Continental Congress The harsh and punitive nature of the Intolerable

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The American Revolution and Confederation, 1774-1787 The First Continental Congress The harsh and punitive nature of the Intolerable Acts drove all the colonies except Georgia to send delegates to a convention in Philadelphia in September 1774. The purpose of the First Continental Congress was to determine how the colonies should react to what seemed to pose an alarming threat to their rights and liberties. Americans had no desire for independence. Actions of the Congress Suffolk Resolves - Rejected the Intolerable Acts and called for their immediate repeal. The measure urged the various colonies to resist the Intolerable Acts by making military preparations and applying economic sanctions (boycott) against Great Britain. Declarations of Rights and Grievances - A petition to the king urging him to redress colonial grievances and restore colonial rights. The document recognized Parliament’s authority to regulate commerce. The Association - Urged the creation of committees in every town to enforce the economic sanctions of the Suffolk Resolves. If colonial rights were not recognized, a final measure called for the meeting of a second congress in May 1775. The Second Continental Congress Delegates to the Second Continental Congress met in Philadelphia in May 1775. Declaration of the Causes and Necessities for Taking Up Arms - Called on the colonies to provide troops. George Washington was appointed the commander in chief of a new colonial army. Olive Branch Petition (July 1775) - Sent to King George III, in which they pledged their loyalty and asked the king to intercede with parliament to secure peace and the
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Dr.dolittle during the Spring '08 term at Cedarville.

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The American - The American Revolution and Confederation 1774-1787 The First Continental Congress The harsh and punitive nature of the Intolerable

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