Colonial Society in the Eighteenth Century

Colonial Society in the Eighteenth Century - Colonial...

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Colonial Society in the Eighteenth Century Population Growth European Immigrants - Large number of Protestants from France - German-speaking people from various German kingdoms - Some came to escape persecution and wars - Others for economic opportunity - English - Germans - Scotch-Irish Africans - The largest single group of non-English immigrants - Made up 20% of colonial population - 90% lived in the south The Structure of colonial Society General Characteristics - Dominance of English culture o Majority of population - Self-government o Representative assembly that was elected by eligible voters - Religious toleration o All colonies permitted the practice of different religions, but with varying dgrees of freedom - No hereditary aristocracy - Social mobility The Family - The family was the economic and social center of colonial life - Over 90% were farmers - Men o Landowners o Dominated politics o English law gave husbands the right to beat wives - Women o Bore children o Household work o Educated children
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course HIST 101 taught by Professor Dr.dolittle during the Spring '08 term at Cedarville.

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Colonial Society in the Eighteenth Century - Colonial...

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