W3-Perception-Notes.pdf - Introducing the Perception...

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Introducing the Perception ProcessPerception is the set of unconscious processes we undergo to make sense of the stimuliand sensations we encounter.LEARNING OBJECTIVESOutline the stages of the perception processKEY TAKEAWAYSKey PointsPerception refers to the set of processes we use to make sense of thedifferent stimuli we’re presented with. Our perceptions are based on how weinterpret different sensations.The perceptual process begins with receiving stimuli from the environmentand ends with our interpretation of those stimuli. This process is typicallyunconscious and happens hundreds of thousands of times a day.When we attend to or select one specific thing in our environment, it becomesthe attended stimulus.Organization of stimuli happens by way of neural processes; this starts withour sensory receptors (touch, taste, smell, sight, and hearing), and istransmitted to our brains, where we organize the information we receive.After we receive and organize stimuli, we can interpret those stimuli, whichsimply means that we take the information and turn it into something that wecan categorize.Key Termspercept: A mental representation of a stimulusPerception Process: A sequence of steps that involves, sequentially:selection of stimuli in the environment, organization of that information, andinterpretation of those stimuli.Perception: The organization, identification, and interpretation of sensoryinformationIntroduction to PerceptionPerception refers to the set of processes we use to make sense of all the stimuli youencounter every second, from the glow of the computer screen in front of you to the smell
of the room to the itch on your ankle. Our perceptions are based on how we interpret allthese different sensations, which are sensory impressions we get from the stimuli in theworld around us. Perception enables us to navigate the world and to make decisionsabout everything, from which T-shirt to wear or how fast to run away from a bear.Close your eyes. What do you remember about the room you are in? The color of thewalls, the angle of the shadows? Whether or not we know it, we selectively attend todifferent things in our environment. Our brains simply don’t have the capacity to attend toevery single detail in the world around us. Optical illusions highlight this tendency. Haveyou ever looked at an optical illusion and seen one thing, while a friend sees somethingcompletely different? Our brains engage in a three-step process when presented withstimuli: selection, organization, and interpretation.For example, think of Rubin’s Vase, a well-known optical illusion depicted below. First weselect the item to attend to and block out most of everything else. It’s our brain’s way offocusing on the task at hand to give it our attention. In this case, we have chosen to attendto the image. Then, we organize the elements in our brain. Some individuals organize thedark parts of the image as the foreground and the light parts as the background, while

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Term
Fall
Professor
NoProfessor
Tags
Law of Proximity, Sensory modality, Rubin s Vase

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