chapter three book summary

chapter three book summary - Chapter 3 Stress and Health...

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Chapter 3: Stress and Health Psychology Chapter Summary I. UNDERSTANDING STRESS - Stress is the body's nonspecific response to any demand made on it. Any stimulus that causes stress is called a stressor. There are both beneficial (eustress) and beneficial (distress) types of stress. A. Sources of Stress - The major sources of stress are discussed: cataclysmic events, chronic stressors, life changes, hassles, burn-out, frustration, and conflict. Frustrations have to do with blocked goals. The Social Readjustment Rating Scale (SRRS measures stress related to changes brought about by major life events) and is presented in Table 3.1. In recent years constantly changing technology has increased the hassles and frustrations of day-to-day living. Conflicts may be of three types: approach-approach, avoidance-avoidance and approach-avoidance. B. Effects of Stress - When stressed, the body undergoes physiological changes. The sympathetic part of the autonomic nervous system is activated, increasing heart rate, blood pressure, and hormone levels. This sympathetic activation is beneficial if people need to fight or flee (“fight or flight response”), but it can have negative consequences to health. Hans Selye described a generalized physiological reaction to severe stressors, which he called the general adaptation syndrome (GAS). The general adaptation syndrome has three phases: the alarm reaction, the resistance phase, and the exhaustion phase. Prolonged stress can suppress the immune system and render the body susceptible to much disease from colds and flu to cancer and cardiovascular disorders.
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