PSYCH 7 DEVELOPMENTAL FOUNDATIONS CHAPTER 6 OFF TO SCHOOL: COGNITIVE AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN MID - 1 PSYC CHAPTER 6 OFF TO SCHOOLCOGNITIVE AND

PSYCH 7 DEVELOPMENTAL FOUNDATIONS CHAPTER 6 OFF TO SCHOOL: COGNITIVE AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN MID

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PSYC CHAPTER 6: OFF TO SCHOOL—COGNITIVE AND PHYSICAL DEVELOPMENT IN MIDDLE CHILDHOOD Physical Development in Middle Childhood https:// Most children gain about 2-3 inches in height and 8 pounds in weight per year Growth o Boys and girls are about the same size during the elementary-school years o Girls are more likely to enter puberty toward the end of the elementary-school years o At ages 11-12, the average girl is about ½ inch taller than the average boy o Most increase in height comes from legs, not from the trunk Development of Motor Skills o Children at 11 can throw a ball 3 times farther than at 6, and jump twice as far Gender Differences in Motor Skills o Fine motor skill improvement occurs for both genders o Girls on average are better in fine motor skills (e.g., handwriting) and certain gross motor skills (flexibility, balance) o Boys on average are better in other gross motor skills (strength, throwing, catching, jumping, running) Physical Fitness o Physical activities promote health o < 50% of U.S. elementary school children meet national fitness standards o Obesity epidemic in U.S. children and teens o Need for improvement: o Little or poor physical education class time o Too much time spent in sedentary activities Cognitive Development in Middle Childhood Piaget’s Account of Cognitive Development (3 rd and 4 th Stage) o Concrete Operational period (7-11 years) Can perform mental operations – actions that can be performed on objects or ideas that yield a consistent result Example: conservation task Mental operations are limited to concrete problems in the here and now Cannot deal effectively with abstract or hypothetical problems https :// o Formal-Operational Period (11 years to adult) Can reason abstractly and hypothetically Understand that a hypothetical problem need not correspond to the
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  • Fall '14
  • Blumenthal,EmilyJeanne
  • Intelligence quotient, IQ test scores, memory strategies

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