AQOTWF Essay - Roshelle Grinberg Due June 3 2011 E6X-09 All Quiet On The Western Front Essay Period 8 A man going to war to fight for his country has

AQOTWF Essay - Roshelle Grinberg Due June 3 2011 E6X-09 All...

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Roshelle GrinbergDue: June 3, 2011E6X-09All Quiet On The Western Front EssayPeriod 8A man going to war to fight for his country has always been seen as a hero. He is risking his life for a supposed better cause, to ensure his nation is safe; however, that is not always the case. In the beginning of the twentieth century, World War One was expected to be a quick military confrontation, but instead it dragged on for years ruining countless lives in the process for a reason that was unknown to many soldiers. The men going to fight enrolled with the ideas of glory, heroism, and honor, ideas drilled in by the older generations, saying that they were making the best decisions of their lives. Instead, they were faced with depression, carnage, dehumanization, and fear.In the novel All Quiet On The Western Front, Erich Maria Remarque destroys the mirage created by older generations that romanticized the idea of war. Through the narration of a young German soldier, Paul Baumer, Remarque depicts the true terrors of trench warfare, and unveils the truth behind the over glorified idea of war. In his novel, Remarque depicts different aspects of that are counterintuitive such as beauty in destruction, homesickness at home, and betrayal by the older generation.During a time of war, soldiers experience the world at its worst, especially during World WarOne. Sitting in trenches, waiting to be bombed; explosions, blood spattering, limbs getting dismembered, machine guns, poison gas; enough to make any person lose their mind. But, in the midst of the utter brutality of war when men are being dehumanized, the protagonist of the novel, Paul Baumer, still manages to find beauty in a world filled with complete carnage. The moon is shining. Along the road troops file. Their helmets gleam softly in the moonlight…The backs of the horses shine in the moonlight, their movements are beautiful, they toss their heads and their eyes gleam. The guns and wagons float past the dim background of the moonlit landscape, the riders in their steel helmets resemble knights of a forgotten time; it is strangely beautiful and arresting. (38-39)The way Paul describes the initial state of stepping onto a battlefield does not sound like the terror and horror that the readers are used to hearing; it is as if this passage was taken straight from a
medieval romance novel. He depicts the horses so elegantly, so beautifully, as if they are going on some remarkable adventure for the king, rather than getting ready to be attacked. “I breathe as deep as I can, and feel the breeze in my face, warm and soft as never before. Thoughts of girls, of flowery meadows, of white clouds suddenly come into my head.” (21) This takes place right after Kemmerich’s death. Paul steps out of the infirmary and his thoughts are plagued with his friend’s passing. During war, men die the most terrible ways, and the soldiers come to realize that every moment, every breath, could be your last. Once the event sunk into Paul, it was as if his eyes were

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