LIB111M Syllabus - Bizzotto - Expository Writing I LIB 111M...

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1 Expository Writing I – LIB 111M Massachusetts College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences Fall 2013 TR 11-12:15 Griffin 207 Instructor: Dr. Julie Bizzotto Telephone: 617-732-2972 Office: W402 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: TR 9:30-10:30am and by appointment Required Texts Diana Hacker. Rules for Writers , 6 th edition. Brenda Spatt. Writing from Sources , 8th Edition. Course Description and Goals LIB 111 focuses on writing clear and coherent summaries, analyses, and essays. The course also stresses the ability to understand, use, and document college-level non-fiction readings as evidence for effectively formulating and accurately supporting a thesis. The primary goals of the course are to improve your writing skills and develop your research abilities. To accomplish this you will produce as much writing as possible and conduct as much research as possible throughout the course. You will also look at the work of professional writers to use as models for our work. You will have reading and writing assignments to do each week that will subsequently be discussed in class. Writing Intensive Statement MCPHS faculty believe that learning in all disciplines is an integrative process, a synthesis of critical reading, thinking, and writing. Students must not only learn to write but also write to learn. Consequently, this course has been designated as Writing Intensive (WI). Students will be required to write 15-20 pages, in 2 or more assignments which may take various forms as determined by the course instructor. In addition, instructors will dedicate class time to the teaching of writing in their specific disciplines, provide feedback on assignments, and allow revision of at least one assignment. Course Learning Outcomes At the completion of this course, students will demonstrate the ability to: 1. recognize and evaluate sound and flawed arguments; 2. write coherent essays, including creating a strong thesis, developing logical analysis and synthesis of their own ideas and others’, and organizing paragraphs with strong topic sentences and transition; 3. present their own and others’ views about a subject clearly, soundly, and accurately by selecting, documenting, and discussing appropriate evidence; 4. quote and/or paraphrase all sources accurately, and cite them using Modern Language Association (MLA) format;
2 5. effectively write various expository genres, including summaries, analysis, synthesis, and argument; 6. demonstrate an understanding of all aspects of the writing process, including pre-writing, drafting, revising, and proofreading for mechanical errors; 7. generate essays and response papers that demonstrate a strong comprehension of vocabulary and usage, and a low error rate (fewer than 2-3 vocabulary/mechanical errors per page); 8. present material orally, in a form that is logical and organized, and which demonstrates knowledge of good public speaking skills, including clear speaking, expressive body language, and effective use of audio-visual materials; 9.

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