Jessica's Doyle essay - Jessica Niele EN101 Professor Kaplan 11\/2714 First Draft Author Brian Doyles takes a look at subject matter with such small

Jessica's Doyle essay - Jessica Niele EN101 Professor...

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Jessica Niele EN101 Professor Kaplan 11/2714 First Draft Author Brian Doyle’s takes a look at subject matter with such small components and turns it into a much larger representation of life’s central means within his essay, Joyas Voladoras. He uses the heart of not only humans, but also of many animals to tell a story of its functionality and relevance to different aspects of everyday life, using lyrical language. The blueprint of his writing provides the reader with hard breaks, or these “white spaces” between his paragraphs, which is used as a poetic device, creating separate stanzas in a sense. The consistent use of his lists in the “stanzas” creates a melody, “…more than three hundred species of them whirring and zooming and nectarring in hummer time zones nine times removed from ours, their hearts hammering faster than we could clearly hear if we pressed our elephantine ears to their infinitesimal chests. “Each one visits a thousand flowers a day. They can dive at sixty miles an hour. They can fly backwards. They can fly more than five hundred miles without pausing to rest. But when they rest they come close to death: on frigid nights, or when they are starving, they retreat into torpor, their metabolic rate slowing to a fifteenth of tier normal sleep rate, their hearts sludging nearly to a halt, barely beating, and if they are not soon warmed, if they do not soon find that which is sweet, their hearts grow cold, and they cease to be. (Doyle 147). Doyle’s poetic nature directly coincides with that of his subject matter. He takes an object with its own rhythm and develops an essay around it. When Doyle
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is describing the fast-paced nature of the hummingbird’s heart he uses the shorter, quicker sentences, “ It’s expensive to fly. You burn out. You fry the machine. You melt the engine” (Doyle 147). However when he is describing the heart of the whale he uses sentences that take much longer to read filled with many commas to create a sentence that takes your breath a way, literally, stating, “ It drinks a hundred pounds a day… arts of the blue whale” (Doyle 148). When a healthy heartbeat is viewed on a monitor, it has no specific pattern to it other than a constant up and down motion with varying lengths. In Doyle’s essay we see no specific pattern in his sentences structure other than a constant variation of short to long lines.
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  • Fall '07
  • Nelson
  • Meaning of life, Doyle, Brian Doyle

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