Reflection 2 - AFRICOL 100 3/9/08 When initially viewing...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
         AFRICOL 100 3/9/08 When initially viewing the video for Viva Fidel’s “Real Talk” I noticed how frequently he incorporated images of people from the Civil Rights movement. This made me connect to the Aldridge reading of how the modern Hip-Hop generationers try in a way to pay homage to the Civil Rights generation. Viva Fidel talks about things that are occurring today such as police brutality and relates it through violence that was affecting the previous generation with images from the 60’s. Through the song lyrics and video for “Real Talk”, Viva Fidel mentions things that are used for show in some parts of the hip-hop culture. It reflects what Kitwana was discussing about the “Taking Back Responsibility” summit. The origins of hip-hop were used to stir social change and draw focus on what was occurring in the urban setting of wherever the specific hip-hop artist was from. Kitwana talks about how some artists such as Will Smith and Lauryn Hill are making a conscious effort to have meaning to their lyrics and not portray an excess environment focused around bling and sex. Viva Fidel seems to frown upon this branch of hip-hop by focusing on issues to encourage social change as well as making the need for Escalades, grillz, or stripper- esque music videos on BET. In “War Goin’ On” it really reiterates what Kitwana discussed with the lack of political
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 3

Reflection 2 - AFRICOL 100 3/9/08 When initially viewing...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 2. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online