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Aquinas - Thomas AQUINAS(1225-1274 I Aquinas's critique of...

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Thomas AQUINAS (1225-1274) I. Aquinas’s critique of Aristotle’s account of happiness Is a life of excellent activity in accordance with reason (with external goods) adequate to our conception of happiness? No. True happiness cannot be had in this life. [I-II, 5.3] (1) “Since [true, perfect] happiness is a ‘perfect and sufficient good’ it excludes every evil and fulfills every desire.” [I-II, 5.3] (2) This life includes many unavoidable evils and leaves many desires unsatisfied. We desire to possess happiness abidingly but human life and everything in it is temporary. We worry about losing the parts of happiness that we possess. (3) [True, perfect] happiness cannot be found in this life. Happiness must be focused on “the vision of the divine essence.” The knowledge of God possible in the afterlife includes complete satisfaction of intellectual, social and personal desires, pleasure and immortality…
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