A Star Called Henry - sex,death,love

A Star Called Henry - sex,death,love - Sex, Death and Love...

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Sex, Death and Love The three themes of sex, death and love are prevalent throughout Roddy Doyle’s novel, A Star Called Henry. For Henry Smart II (or the III, depending), the themes are so interwoven with one another that they seem nearly synonymous. He is, himself, a product of both love and death, from the beginning of his life to where we leave him, at the age of twenty. First and foremost, Henry is a product of the deaths that surround his family. He is the second son born to Henry Smart and Melody Nash. At a young age, Henry takes to the street, eventually raising himself and his younger brother Victor, struggling to survive. Victor is the first person whom Henry truly cares about; perhaps the first person he loves, as Henry feels obligated to care for him. During his short years with Victor, Henry tries to provide as best he can towards both their futures. He enrolls himself and his brother at School, in order to learn to read and write. There, Henry finds himself strongly attracted to his teacher, Mrs. O’Shea. It is perhaps because of this initial
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A Star Called Henry - sex,death,love - Sex, Death and Love...

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