h31_lecture23_2

h31_lecture23_2 - Lecture 23 Electronic Noise Boris Murmann...

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EE 214 Lecture 23 (HO#31) B. Murmann 1 Lecture 23 Electronic Noise Boris Murmann Stanford University murmann@stanford.edu Copyright © 2004 by Boris Murmann EE 214 Lecture 23 (HO#31) B. Murmann 2 Overview Reading – 11.1 (Noise Introduction) – 11.2.2 (Thermal Noise) – 11.3.3 (MOS Transistor Noise) Introduction – Today's lecture provides a brief introduction to electronic noise in resistors and MOSFET devices. We'll look at both the "fundamental" thermal noise and also technology dependent 1/f noise. While 1/f noise is usually negligible at radio frequencies, it has become a non-negligible component in many "baseband" applications, mostly due to an increase in the so-called "1/f corner" in modern technologies.
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EE 214 Lecture 23 (HO#31) B. Murmann 3 Types of Noise "Man made noise", interference noise – Signal coupling – Substrate coupling – Finite power supply rejection – Solutions • Fully differential circuits • Layout techniques "Electronic noise" or "device noise" – Fundamental • E.g. "thermal noise" caused by random motion of carriers – Technology related • "Flicker noise" caused by material defects and "roughness" EE 214 Lecture 23 (HO#31) B. Murmann 4 Significance of Electronic Noise Limits minimum signal that can be processed/detected The noise level of a circuit directly trades with power dissipation and speed – In most circuits, low noise dictates the use of large capacitors and/or large g m which means high power dissipation • More next lecture Noise has become increasingly important in modern technologies with reduced supply voltages – Signal to noise ratio ~ V swing 2 /P noise Designing a low power, precision circuit requires good understanding of electronic noise!
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EE 214 Lecture 23 (HO#31) B. Murmann 5 Ideal Resistor Constant current, independent of time Non-physical – In a physical resistor, carriers "randomly" collide with lattice atoms, giving rise to small current variations over time 1k 1V i(t) i(t) 1V/1k EE 214 Lecture 23 (HO#31) B. Murmann 6
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h31_lecture23_2 - Lecture 23 Electronic Noise Boris Murmann...

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