ANTH Syllabus

ANTH Syllabus - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE UNITED STATES ANTHROPOLOGY 2350 SPRING 2008 MWF 12-12:50 Biology 106 Instructor Office Phone Email Office

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Page 1 of 10 CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE UNITED STATES ANTHROPOLOGY 2350 SPRING 2008 MWF, 12-12:50, Biology 106 Instructor: Beverly Ann Davenport, PhD, MSPH Office: Chilton Hall, 330G Phone: 565-2292 Email: [email protected] Office Hours: Wednesday, 2:00-4:000 PM or by appointment (please call or email me to schedule) COURSE DESCRIPTION AND OBJECTIVES What is culture? What do we mean when we say “cultural diversity?” Is this a code for saying “people who don’t look like we do?” And who is the “we” implied in that previous sentence? These are the kinds of questions we will explore in this class. This course examines the emergence of and dynamic patterns of interaction between cultural groups in the United States. The most obvious groups in American history are racial and/or ethnic groups, but there are other ways to think about difference that have meaning in the American social scene. What about religion? What about social class? What about regional variation? What about gender? What about sexual preference? While we will focus primarily on racial and ethnic groups, the larger aim of the class is to encourage students to think in more informed ways about all kinds of difference, to become more sophisticated in examining the way race and culture are used as terms in every day speech, to gain insight into our own attitudes and to develop greater awareness of and curiosity about the many cultural worlds contained in these United States. The lectures will focus on the macro historical and social forces that helped to establish relations of dominance and subordination between groups in our society. Occasional films and class discussions will put a “face” on some of the abstractions of the readings. Writing assignments are designed to help you make the link between historical processes and your own experience. At the end of this class I expect you to have a solid understanding of: the technical language that anthropologists and other social scientists use to discuss culture, race, and ethnicity in the U.S historical trends in immigration in the U.S. and changing attitudes towards immigration; assimilation theory and some of the challenges to it; the role of ideology, including scientific ideologies, in supporting and sustaining belief systems that favor established, dominant groups, a sense of your personal connection to the questions this course addresses. You will practice applying your understanding of these concepts in this class and it is expected that you will become more and more skilled in using these ideas in your reading, thinking, discussing and writing over the course of the semester.
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Page 2 of 10 REQUIRED READINGS Required Textbook: Charles A. Gallagher, 2007. Rethinking the Color Line, 3 rd edition. Boston:
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course ANTH 2350 taught by Professor Davenport during the Spring '08 term at North Texas.

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ANTH Syllabus - CULTURAL DIVERSITY IN THE UNITED STATES ANTHROPOLOGY 2350 SPRING 2008 MWF 12-12:50 Biology 106 Instructor Office Phone Email Office

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