Chapter 9 - Socioemotional Development in Adolescence - Chapter Nine Moving into the Adult Social World Socioemotional Development in Adolescence

Chapter 9 - Socioemotional Development in Adolescence -...

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Chapter Nine Moving into the Adult Social World: Socioemotional Development in Adolescence
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Lecture Outline Identity & Self-Esteem Erikson’s theory, Identity Phases Romantic Relationships & Sexuality Relationships, Sexual Behavior & Orientation Work Part-time jobs, Career development Negative Outcomes of Adolescence Drugs, Depression, Delinquency
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The Search for Identity Erikson: identity achievement vs. identity (role) confusion Balancing between selecting a single self vs. trying out many possible selves Via formal operational thought, fantasize about various roles and do “trial runs” Strong focus on career roles Also focus on talents, romance, friendships, religion, politics, gender orientation, & roles
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The Search for Identity Many teenagers go through various phases when searching for identity Not sequential like other stage theories Most in a state of diffusion or foreclosure (see table next slide) Older teens tend to alternate between moratorium and achievement These phases don’t only apply to career identities, but also to religion, politics, etc.
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Marcia’s Four Identity Statuses
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Characteristics of Adolescents’ Thinking Adolescent egocentrism: recognize other’s feelings, but only care about their own Imaginary audience: think that peers are constantly watching and judging them Happens with adults too: Spotlight effect
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Characteristics of Adolescents’ Thinking Personal Fable: teenagers’ tendency to believe no one has ever felt or experienced what they have Illusion of invulnerability: misfortune only happens to others Can explain risky choices made by teens All of these characteristics become less common as teens progress towards identity
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Ethnic Identity About 1/3 of adolescent and young adults belong to an ethnic minority; they typically develop an ethnic identity Three phases to achieving this identity Ethnic roots are unimportant to them Exploring their ethnic heritage’s personal impact and learning cultural traditions Development of a distinct ethnic self-identity Generally speaking, having an ethnic identity is beneficial to adolescents
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Self-Esteem in Adolescence Comparisons with peers entering middle school often gradually decreases self-esteem relative to elementary school As children adjust to this new “pecking order,” their self-esteem increases and then stabilizes during adolescence Adolescents particularly differentiate their social self-esteem (e.g., positive about parent, but negative about romantic relationships) Self-worth also varies by ethnicity
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Influences on Adolescents’ Self-Esteem Adolescents’ self-worth is higher when: They are skilled in domains they value
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  • Fall '14
  • Blumenthal,EmilyJeanne

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