Exploration.docx - Exploration From Wikipedia, the free...

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ExplorationFrom Wikipedia, the free encyclopediaJump to navigationJump to search"Explorer" redirects here. For explorers, see Explorer (disambiguation)."Expeditions" redirects here. For other uses, see Expeditions (disambiguation).For the video game, see Exploration (video game).Professor G. A. Wallin (1811–1852), a Finnish explorer and orientalist, who is remembered for hisjourneys to the Middle East during the 1840s.[1][2][3] Portrait of Wallin by R. W. Ekman, 1853.Exploration is the act of searching for the purpose of discovery of information or resources, especially inthe context of geography or space, rather than research and development that is usually not centred onearth sciences or astronomy.[citation needed] Exploration occurs in all non-sessile animal species,including humans. In human history, its most dramatic rise was during the Age of Discovery whenEuropean explorers sailed and charted much of the rest of the world for a variety of reasons. Since then,major explorations after the Age of Discovery have occurred for reasons mostly aimed at informationdiscovery.[citation needed]Contents1Concept2Notable historical periods of human exploration2.1Phoenician galley sailings2.1.1Carthaginean exploration of Western Africa2.2Greek & Roman exploration of Northern Europe and Thule2.3Roman explorations2.4Chinese exploration of Central Asia2.5Viking Age2.6Polynesian Age2.7Chinese exploration of the Indian Ocean2.8European Age of Discovery2.9The Modern Age
2.10Space exploration3Behavioral trait4See also5References5.1Notes5.2Works cited6Further reading7External linksConceptExploration (like science more generally), particularly its understanding and use has been criticallydiscussed as historically being framed and used, at the latest since the Age of Discovery up to thecontemporary age of space exploration,[4][5][6][7][8] for colonialistic ventures, discrimination andexploitation, by reinvigorating concepts such as the "frontier" (as in frontierism) and manifest destiny.[9]Notable historical periods of human explorationPhoenician galley sailingsThe Phoenicians (1550 BCE–300 BCE) traded throughout the Mediterranean Sea and Asia Minor thoughmany of their routes are still unknown today. The presence of tin in some Phoenician artifacts suggeststhat they may have traveled to Britain. According to Virgil's Aeneid and other ancient sources, thelegendary Queen Dido was a Phoenician from Tyre who sailed to North Africa and founded the city ofCarthage.Carthaginean exploration of Western AfricaHanno the Navigator (500 BC), a Carthaginean navigator who explored the Western Coast of Africa.Greek & Roman exploration of Northern Europe and ThuleThe Greek explorer from Marseille, Pytheas (380 – c. 310 BC) was the first to circumnavigate GreatBritain, explore Germany, and reach Thule (most commonly thought to be the Shetland Islands orIceland).

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Term
Fall
Professor
RuthanneDyer
Tags
Test, The Aeneid, Age of Discovery, Atlantic Ocean, Pacific Ocean

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