STUDY GUIDE - unit 3

STUDY GUIDE - unit 3 - Study Guide Unit 3 -DEFINITIONS: 1....

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–3. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Study Guide – Unit 3 - DEFINITIONS: 1. Covary - to what extent the scores of one variable are reliably related to those of another variable 2. Correlation - Relationship between 2 variables. 3. Correlational research - the process researchers use to determine whether 2 or more naturally occurring variables are related 3. Correlation coefficient - number that indicates to what degree 2 variables are related in a linear fashion 4. Coefficient of determination - indicates the proportion of systematic variance in one variable that can be accounted for by the other variable 5. Restriction of range 6. Online outlier - Scores that deviate obviously from the rest of the data; can make the correlation seem stronger than it should be 7. Offline outlier - Scores that deviate obviously from the rest of the data; can make the correlation seem weaker than it should be 8. Directionality problem - does variable A cause variable B, or does variable B cause variable A? 9. Third variable problem - an extraneous variable may account for the correlation between 2 variables 10. Partial correlation - allow us to examine the correlation between 2 variables when the influence of a 3 rd variable is removed. Correlation coefficients : -When do you use Pearson’s r? - The most common correlation coefficient Ranges from -1.0 to +1.0 Need to interpret the sign and the magnitude of the number Only use with continuous variables! -When do you use phi? -Phi: used when both variables are categorical -When do you use spearman’s rho? - used when both variables are ordinal -When do you use point biserial? - used when one variable is continuous and one is categorical -Know the 2 things you look at to interpret a correlation coefficient 1) Sign “+” means a direct, positive relationship “-” means an inverse, negative relationship 2) Magnitude The size of the number tells you how strong the correlation is. -What we conclude if there’s a significantly large correlation between 2 variables; what we conclude if there’s not a significantly large correlation between 2 variables
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
- What are the factors that affect correlations (SIGNIFICANCE?), and how does each factor affect it? 1) Sample Size
Background image of page 2
Image of page 3
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course DEP 3103 taught by Professor Lane during the Spring '08 term at FSU.

Page1 / 5

STUDY GUIDE - unit 3 - Study Guide Unit 3 -DEFINITIONS: 1....

This preview shows document pages 1 - 3. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online