Gov Paper

Gov Paper - In 2002, Republican candidate and former U.S....

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In 2002, Republican candidate and former U.S. Congressman Mark Sanford was elected the new Governor of South Carolina. It was a frustrating moment for the Democrats, who had been campaigning thoroughly to reelect Democrat Jim Hodges as the Governor for a second term. Similarly, the Presidential elections of 2000 and 2004 were times of delight and misery in South Carolina - depending on which party you were in. The main issues regarding the race for Governor between these two candidates were education and the state budget. Because South Carolina had become solidly Republican over the years, Mark Sanford won by a margin of six percent. In understanding what factors determined this and other recent elections in South Carolina, the demographics as well as other statistics must be examined closely. The demographics of South Carolina are quite similar to the United States as a whole in most respects, but some state statistics clearly differ from the national statistics, especially with regard to race. South Carolina has a large African-American population compared to the national average. In 2000, the national average of African-Americans per state was 12%, and South Carolina was 29% black i . In past years, African-Americans have tended to vote more democratic compared to whites in the same districts. As a historically conservative state, this large representation of the population being black is crucial for the Democratic Party. It is also the case that the majority of minority groups throughout the United States tend to vote more democratic than whites of the same region. Although South Carolina has a large black population, it clearly lacks a Hispanic population compared to the national average. South Carolina was 2% Hispanic in 2000, while the national average was 13% ii .
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South Carolina is a state with a great deal of rural population and many blue- collar workers. In 2000, the average amount of people living in rural areas in the United States was 21%, and in South Carolina the population was 40% rural. In the same year, 31% of workers in South Carolina were blue-collar, and the national average was 25%
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course GOV 100 taught by Professor Stephenson during the Spring '08 term at F & M.

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Gov Paper - In 2002, Republican candidate and former U.S....

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