Jane Eyre midterm essay - Ortiz 1 Ada Ortiz Instructor Hans ENG-242 Midterm Essay Jane Eyre Jane Eyre was a character who underwent many tragic

Jane Eyre midterm essay - Ortiz 1 Ada Ortiz Instructor Hans...

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Ortiz 1 Ada Ortiz Instructor Hans ENG-242 10/13/15 Midterm Essay: Jane Eyre Jane Eyre was a character who underwent many tragic circumstances from early childhood to adulthood. Charlotte Brontë, the author, created a character who the reader had the pleasure of watching evolve. It is impossible not to appreciate the character of Jane Eyre, as she is one that symbolizes the epitome of rebellion as she dares to question matters such as social class, gender roles, and religion. The narration of the novel by Jane herself gives the audience an insight into her innermost subconscious thoughts, which allows the reader to become better acquainted with her as the protagonist of this novel. As seen in Volume 1, Jane is raised by an aunt Reed and her family in a toxic, hostile environment. Being rejected by her family, led her to alienation and the desire for freedom and to belong. After undergoing a situation with her aunt, we are given a glimpse into Jane’s personality with a comment she makes, " I was endeavoring in good earnest to acquire a more sociable and childlike disposition, a more attractive and sprightly manner--something lighter, franker, more natural, as it were--she really could must exclude me from privileges intended only for contented, happy, little children,"(Brontë, page 1). Even at a young age, Jane displays maturity beyond her years, and an unrelenting habit of questioning everything surrounding her. Jane is also portrayed as an individual who craves affection from her loved ones and those she meets, however, being unable to find the affection she looks for she retreats into isolation.
Ortiz 2 After managing to free herself from the oppressive environment she was raised in, she finds herself at an all-girl boarding school. Here she finds herself genuinely content despite the cruel treatment her and her classmates are subjected to by Mr. Brocklehurst. Jane can be quoted saying, "Well has Solomon said--'Better is a dinner of herbs where love is, than a stalled ox and hatred therewith.' I would not now have exchanged Lowood with all its privations, for Gateshead and its daily luxuries,” (Brontë, page 71). Finding companionship and acceptance in Helen Burns and Miss Temple, Jane prefers the unacceptable living conditions offered at Lowood over the luxuries and accommodations which could be found at Gateshead with her real family. Finally having found the acceptance and belonging she craved, Jane found herself growing fond of Helen Burns and Miss Temples.

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