BLAKE - Steve Le Eng 103- Dr. Soles 11/1/05 William Blake's...

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Steve Le Eng 103- Dr. Soles 11/1/05 William Blake’s “The Tyger” and “The Lamb” In "The Tyger", by William Blake, the author uses the tiger as a symbol to show that evil is real, that a force other than God must exist and must have created the tiger. The tiger is used to contrast "The Lamb", which Blake sees as proof that God must exist, for who else but the almighty god could have created such a beautiful creature. He uses these two real-life extremes-- one ferocious animal and one loving animal- to illustrate the differences that exist between the two extremes in the afterlife. In both poems, the question he attempts to answer is who exactly it was that created each creature. In “The Lamb”, he concludes that the lamb was created by someone who “is called by thy name, for he calls himself a lamb.” Basically he is using the idea of the Lamb of God, which is mentioned numerous times throughout the bible. In “The Tyger”, he never answers that question, or at least he does not state his conclusion. Instead, he is content with ending his poem with his original question: “What immortal hand or eye, could frame thy fearful symmetry?” (24). Both poems are in a fairly concrete form. “The Tyger” is written in four-line stanzas, in a very traditional rhyme pattern, in which lines are paired up, and each stanzas
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BLAKE - Steve Le Eng 103- Dr. Soles 11/1/05 William Blake's...

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