DSL - DSL Joby Martin Comm240 Joby Martin Comm 240 DSL...

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DSL
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Joby Martin Comm240 2/6/06
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Joby Martin Comm 240 2/6/06 DSL: Digital Subscriber Line The digital subscriber line, or DSL, is a high-speed internet technology which was mass-commercialized in the late 1990’s. Using existing ‘last mile’ technology, DSL, along with cable modems, brought about the virtual extinction of dial-up modems. Broadband internet has had wide ranging economic, social, and peripheral technological effects. However, although DSL was regarded as top-notch only a few years ago, it is slowly becoming obsolete. DSL utilizes the unused frequency spectrum which is created naturally by telephone lines. It is typically referred to as a “last mile” technology; as it uses the final segment of the copper twisted pair cables which are used by telephone companies to connect their central offices to the homes their customers. By using leftover frequencies to transmit digital signals, information can be transmitted at a higher rate than traditional dial-up connections. The dial-up connections that were available before DSL became commercially available were limited to 56.6 kilobytes per second. At minimum, DSL operates at 128 kpbs. However, some DSL connections can operate at speeds of up to 24000 kpbs. (Wikipedia) Aside from higher connection speeds, DSL also transmits digital signals without any sort of interruption to normal telephone service. This was a technological
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breakthrough, instantly eliminating the need for dial-up, increasing connection speeds, and providing a figurative dose of ibuprofen for the headaches caused by missed calls, busy signals, and secondary telephone lines. (Germain) Another advantage of DSL over dial-up connections is that, since DSL operates mostly on frequency that already exists, telephone companies are able to largely side-step the costly procedure of digging trenches to install new cable wires. And since there are an estimated 1 billion telephone wires in the world, there is plenty of space for establishing new DSL connections (Wikipedia.org). There are many different kinds of DSL services. ADSL, or asymmetric digital subscriber line, is the most common type of DSL service. It is called ‘asymmetric’ because its download speed is faster than its upload speed. This means that speed of ADSL connections is actually measured in two numbers: upstream and downstream. Within this classification DSL, there are numerous other types, including G.lite DSL, Rate-Adaptive DSL, and Reach Extended DSL. (DSL Forum) G.lite was developed for the sole purpose of meeting plug and play requirements. Plug and play refers to a computer’s ability to acquire and install new software without having to reconfigure or sometimes even restart your computer. It is a medium bandwidth version of ADSL, which operates ay up to 1.5 MBps. Rate adaptive DSL is a non- standard version of ADSL, which, as its name would imply, has the ability to adapt to upstream speeds in order to obtain a desired downstream speed. Reach Extended DSl, the
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DSL - DSL Joby Martin Comm240 Joby Martin Comm 240 DSL...

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