effective literacy teaching techniques

effective literacy teaching techniques - A REVIEW OF...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
A REVIEW OF TOPPING AND FERGUSON’S EFFECTIVE LITERACY TEACHING BEHAVIORS Joby Martin PSY 336 5/27/05
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
In their article Effective Literacy Teaching Behaviors , Keith Topping and Nancy Ferguson focus on what patterns and behaviors exhibited by teachers are more effective when teaching in general literacy contexts. They argue that while any pre-packaged program for combating illiteracy may or may not be effective, what is most essential in the process of literacy learning is the skills of the teacher. The duo set out to answer numerous questions regarding methods of literacy teaching, mainly what specific teaching behaviors are the habit of effective literacy teachers, and potential differences between the teaching styles of effective literacy teachers. Furthermore, the authors of this article also explore the perceptions of these teachers, what exactly they perceive to be the effective methods in their teachings. Before focusing on their own study, Topping and Ferguson reviewed previous studies pertaining to this topic. They examined the different teaching styles of effective literacy teachers, and compared to teachers who are not labeled as such. Through these numerous studies, they compiled a list of practices by effective literacy teachers observed by other researchers. This list has an underlying theme: the use of interaction. Teachers interacted with their pupils by use of shared reading, asking questions, requiring review and response following readings, and keeping pupil’s attention focused throughout reading exercised this. Topping and Ferguson characterized these practices as a 2 2
Background image of page 2
preference to coaching, as opposed to telling or lecturing. However, they feel that much of this previous research is at least somewhat flawed. These empirical studies either centered on interviews and surveys, or focused mainly on classroom observation. The research of Topping and Ferguson, however, was gathered by using both. Five teachers were selected from different schools in the same district in a sample area in western Scotland. The school district used in the sample was considered low income, with 34% of students receiving free school lunches (double the national average). The five teachers selected had all been identified as being effective literacy teachers, picked “on the basis of high pupil literacy attainment and expert nomination.” Each was currently teaching in, and had the bulk of their experience in, the first year of formal education. Their experienced ranged from five years to 26 years, with an average of 16. Their class sizes ranged from 24 to 28 students, with the average age of students being roughly five years, five months old. These instructors were then observed during class time, particularly during
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course POLS 120 taught by Professor Dr.brent during the Winter '08 term at San Jose State.

Page1 / 9

effective literacy teaching techniques - A REVIEW OF...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online