2.15 Astro 1

2.15 Astro 1 - Astro 1 Section 1 Professor Brandt Monday...

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Astro 1 Section 1 Professor Brandt Monday February 15th 1999 Announcements: Lecture notes: Class 16 At 8 pm tonight find Polaris so facing N then turning 180 degrees so facing S. The brightest star you'll see is Sirius which is in Canis Major. Sirius is the brightest star in the sky (other than the sun) 8.6 ly distant. Actually though it's not 1 star but rather a binary. Sirius A = A star 26 L (.) Sirius B = white dwarf 4% L (.) 1.1 M (.) 5570km Radius. Density of Sirius B is about a million times larger than things familiar to us in the solar system. Now if you go up and to the right you'll come to 2 other bright stars. ... Betelgeuse and Rigel in Orion - "the hunter" Orion contains a great gas cloud complex in which stars are forming - the Orion Nebula. Betelgeuse is a fascinating star. Red Supergiant - radius is 580 million km nearly 4 times the Earth-Sun distance. 3600 L (.) 400 ly away 20 M (.) in a fairly advanced state of nuclear burning but we can't tell how far along. Probably has onion skin configuration of nuclear burning as we have discussed. Will probably go supernova in the next 10 000 years or so. When it does it will be as bright as the moon. In the last class we discussed deaths of massive stars. Fuse elements up to iron
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2.15 Astro 1 - Astro 1 Section 1 Professor Brandt Monday...

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