Final Review (Prisons) Part 2

Final Review (Prisons) Part 2 - REVIEW PART 2 CHAPTER 9-pg...

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REVIEW PART 2 CHAPTER 9 -pg. 230 – racial stereotypes Most controversial practice in contemporary CJ, humiliating and traumatic . -profiling **couple of questions on this section -pg. 230-231 -pretextual stops 1. “out of place” (“border patrol”) – occur in predominately white areas where being black or brown is viewed as being suspicious 2. “urban control” – aimed at young minorities whom police have profiled as drug traffickers despite any evidence other than their race 3. Terry stops – target minority pedestrians, usually young African Americans or Latinos - Terry v. Ohio —1968, police did not need a warrant to stop and frisk someone if danger was sensed -racial profiling is well documented, but the fact that it does not benefit law enforcement is commonly overlooked -law enforcement agencies widen their net in an attempt to apprehend more lawbreakers -pg. 232 Professor David Cole Claims racial profiling yields no significant increase in arrests
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-Georgetown -role of race/profiling in Criminal Justice - HIT RATE! -in NJ, whites = highest hit rate for drugs -pg. 234 photo, governor of NJ -shook down black guy in Camden -News reporter (NEW YORK TIMES) & photographer were there with her -paid off victim, but photos and reports still got out -pg. 234 sentencing, race, ethnicity, and class -Steffensmeier, Ulmer, and Kramer study -focal concerns -young, black, male = harshest prison terms -“perpetual shorthand” Judges don’t have enough info to asses that causes them to fill in the gaps with race and ethnicity -Spohn study – Replicated the Steffensmeier, Ulmer and Kramer study in 2000, found comparable results and confirmed perpetual shorthand -liberation hypothesis -judges have latitude to make decisions beyond evidence -(fill in gaps often by race, ethnicity) -prison life (minorities)
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-Latinos – Face discrimination Steffenmeier & Demuth in 2001 studied race and ethnicity’s impact on the war on drugs. Hispanic may be more disadvantaged than blacks due to poverty, unemployment, poor education & single parent families (we see them as a threat) -Africans – Face formal and informal oppression. Prison is “the next phase” they’re justified in feeling discriminated against. -pg. 238 case -George Jackson – 1960’s black inmates were shot to death, CO’s found innocent. After that a white CO was beat to death in that jail and 3 black inmates were charged with murder. Jackson was a black militant and prisoner’s rights movement. Defense said he was picked out for murder because he was a known militant. 3 defendants known as soledad brothers, charges were dismissed Jackson wrote a book about it, in ’71 jackson was killed by a CO who claimed he was trying to escape
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This note was uploaded on 02/02/2009 for the course 215 202 taught by Professor Welch during the Spring '09 term at Rutgers.

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Final Review (Prisons) Part 2 - REVIEW PART 2 CHAPTER 9-pg...

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