Wilson's 14 Points

Wilson's 14 Points - Chris Kokkinis English 345 October 10,...

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Chris Kokkinis English 345 October 10, 2006 President Wilson’s Fourteen Points After the November eleventh armistice of the Great War, the world’s attention shifted to post-war matters. With the German empire exhausted and disheartened by the anticlimactic conclusion to the war, the Allied powers held the upper hand in matters of negotiating. The British and the French, under Lloyd George and Georges Clemenceau, respectively, sought out a solution that would severely cripple the German Empire and prevent them from possibly recovering on a military level ever again. In doing so, however, Germany would also go into an economic shambles and a state of social chaos. At the Conference at Versailles in France, President Woodrow Wilson represented the United States in the negotiating of a treaty. Contrary to the opinions of George and Clemenceau, Wilson did not seek to ruin Germany. Instead, Wilson suggested, in his Fourteen Points, a more peaceful solution, favoring the formation of a League of
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This essay was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course ENG 345 taught by Professor Hubbard during the Fall '08 term at SUNY Buffalo.

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Wilson's 14 Points - Chris Kokkinis English 345 October 10,...

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