Bianca Hernandez - Multi Genre Paper - HERNANDEZ 1 Bianca Hernandez Professor Laura Morris English 203 5 April 2015 Two Lives Two Lifestyles People do

Bianca Hernandez - Multi Genre Paper - HERNANDEZ 1 Bianca...

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HERNANDEZ Bianca Hernandez Professor Laura Morris English 203 5 April 2015 Two Lives, Two Lifestyles People do not get to choose what kind of life they are born into such as poor or wealthy, but they do have the option of deciding on what they can do for themselves. Raymond Carver’s fiction “Cathedral”, Chenjerai Hove’s poem “You will Forget”, and Donella Meadow’s nonfiction “Living Lightly and Inconsistently on the Land” all come together to bring out two different perspectives of life and how people deal with certain circumstances. The way these authors all portray their view points are the fact that someone can be unfortunate in any way and make the most of it, or be a person that is too self involved with their normal luxurious life that they may take it for granted. There is one strong subject that helps tie these three pieces together, and that would be guilt. Though this word is usually associated with negativity, it is brought about in a different way. In all three works, the way the authors incorporate guilt make it easy to comprehend the difference between being rich and being poor, but just because a person has fortune does not mean they are fortunate. All three authors brought in guilt in a different way, and it basically all depended on how the reader interpreted the story. In “Cathedral” the author never really implements the word guilt, but it is clear that the husband is feeling it in his responses to the blind man. It is very detailed in how they show the comparisons between the husband and the 1
blind man and how they both just give up very different personas. During casual conversations, it is the way the author makes it to be how the husband compares himself in a negative way in his thoughts that portray the guilty side. Such as when the wife and husband are talking and he mentions, “I don’t have any blind friends” and she replies with a, “You don’t have any friends” (Carver 3). It is comments like this one throughout the story that make it evident that he starts to realize how much more enjoyable and lively the blind man is over him. The blind man even “talked in his loud voice about conversations he’d had with fellow operators in Guam, in the Philippines, in Alaska, and even in Tahiti” while the husband sat down hoping he wouldn’t ask him any more questions because he hadn’t done much with his life (Carver 7). Towards the end when they are drawing the cathedral, it is when the husband can’t even explain how a cathedral looks to the blind man where he truly realizes that he has been given the gift of sight over the blind man and has chosen not to use it to his advantage.

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