{[ promptMessage ]}

Bookmark it

{[ promptMessage ]}

21-Introduction to Thermodynamics

21-Introduction to Thermodynamics - Introduction to...

Info icon This preview shows pages 1–2. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Introduction to Thermodynamics B. A. Rowland 53750/53760 What is Energy? In this class, we will define energy as the ability to produce work (w) or heat (q) . Energy is a conserved quantity, which means it can never be created or destroyed, just converted among its various forms. This is a statement of the Law of Conservation of Energy. We can classify energy into two types: Kinetic (the energy due to an object's motion) and Potential (the energy due to an object's composition or position ). In chemical systems, we will be concerned with Kinetic and Potential energy. The Kinetic Energy in a chemical system manifests itself as the system Temperature (see lecture on KMT), while the potential energy is bound up in the chemical bonds (composition). System v. Surroundings In thermodynamics, we can partition the entire universe into a system and the surroundings (Universe = System + Surroundings). The system is defined as the part of the universe where the interesting process (say, a chemical reaction in a beaker or a gas in a piston) is occurring; everything else (me, you, the apparatus, the sun, etc.) is defined as the surroundings. It is important to note that the frame of reference for thermodynamical calculations is the system . It would seem that we would take the viewpoint from the surroundings (since that is where the observer (you) is). However, the convention is to view things from the point of the system, and that is how we shall do it.
Image of page 1

Info icon This preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Image of page 2
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

{[ snackBarMessage ]}

What students are saying

  • Left Quote Icon

    As a current student on this bumpy collegiate pathway, I stumbled upon Course Hero, where I can find study resources for nearly all my courses, get online help from tutors 24/7, and even share my old projects, papers, and lecture notes with other students.

    Student Picture

    Kiran Temple University Fox School of Business ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    I cannot even describe how much Course Hero helped me this summer. It’s truly become something I can always rely on and help me. In the end, I was not only able to survive summer classes, but I was able to thrive thanks to Course Hero.

    Student Picture

    Dana University of Pennsylvania ‘17, Course Hero Intern

  • Left Quote Icon

    The ability to access any university’s resources through Course Hero proved invaluable in my case. I was behind on Tulane coursework and actually used UCLA’s materials to help me move forward and get everything together on time.

    Student Picture

    Jill Tulane University ‘16, Course Hero Intern