Analysis 3 - palaces that were constantly burned down, so...

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Adam Cornwell Monday, February 18, 2008 IDS 210.1 Analysis 3 Japanese and Chinese gardens both have their similarities and differences. Japanese gardens were often large and made for amusement. They also had lakes to represent seas and oceans. In Japanese aesthetics they like their gardens to be irregular and simple. The Japanese felt as if irregularity was more interesting than the symmetry of the Chinese gardens. In Chinese gardens, they believe in the yin and the yang. The yin represents water and yang represents rock. They liked to have their gardens be symbolic of a small word. In both Japanese and Chinese cultures, it is important to have money in order to have a garden. The upper class was more likely to have the gardens. The garden that I chose was the Sento Gasho. I like ho the garden is separated by a north and south pond. I like how it has islands that are unconnected to the shore and how it has a bridge that connects the two large islands. These gardens represent two
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Unformatted text preview: palaces that were constantly burned down, so even though it is to a much reduced scale, it keeps the history intact. An aesthetic principle that applies to these gardens is irregularity. The stones on the outer edge of the shore are all different and interesting. Yoshida Kenko and Thomas Mann share the value of impermanence and have many similarities. In both essays they refer to the beginning and end of things. Mann believes that where there is no impermanence, neither is there time, and timelessness is a constant void. Mann believes that lifes appeal is enhanced with the idea that no one knows how long he or she has to live. Kenko feels that, Were we to live on forever Adam Cornwell Monday, February 18, 2008 IDS 210.1 then indeed would men not feel the pity of things. He also says, Long life brings many shames....
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Analysis 3 - palaces that were constantly burned down, so...

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