CHM 306 Final Pres

CHM 306 Final Pres - Brownian Motion, Diffusion and the...

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Brownian Motion, Diffusion and the Brownian Motor CHM 306 April 23, 2007 David Grauer
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Topics to be Discussed Brownian Motion History, Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics Feynman’s Brownian Ratchet Derivation of Frick’s two Laws of Diffusion Creating a Brownian Motor Applicability of Frick’s Laws Example of a Brownian Motor
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Brownian Motion Overview and History Brownian Motion is the random “jittering” of particles in a medium. Robert Brown first observed it in pollen granules under a microscope in 1827. Quantitatively explained by Einstein as the constant collision of particles in the medium in his now famous series of 1905 articles. QuickTime and a TIFF (Uncompressed) decompressor are needed to see this picture. http://www.doc.ic.ac.uk/~nd/surprise_95/journal/vol4/ykl/report.html
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Brownian Motion Thermodynamics and Statistical Mechanics Let’s think of Brownian Motion in a gas, its there, but we just don’t see it… As the result of translational energy, can be attributed to 3/2kT. With all that energy and motion inherent to the system, is it possible to derive work from it without input? Remember the Maxwell-Boltzmann
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This note was uploaded on 10/05/2007 for the course CHM 306 taught by Professor Wolfgangrichter during the Spring '07 term at Princeton.

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CHM 306 Final Pres - Brownian Motion, Diffusion and the...

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