Chapter 17

Chapter 17 - Chapter 17 - Acid-Base Equilibria when you...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Chapter 17 - Acid-Base Equilibria when you dissolve 0.10 mole of a strong acid like HCl in 1.0 liter of  water, it is easy to calculate the final [H3O+] - but what about  dissolving 0.10 mole of a weak acid like acetic acid, how would you  calculate the [H3O+] for this? other common weak acids are  acetylsalicylic acid (aspirin), phenobarbital (a sedative), saccharin (a  sweetener), nicotinic acid ( a B vitamin), and ascorbic acid (vitamin C) in order to calculate the hydronium ion concentration for fixed  amounts of these acids, you need to know the equilibrium constant  for the reaction and then solve an equilibrium problem the same is  true for weak bases, as well as certain salts of acids and bases for the ionization of the weak acid, acetic acid, write HC2H3O2(aq)  +  H2O(l)  <---->  H3O+(aq)  +  C2H3O2-(aq) since HAc is a weak acid or electrolyte, it only ionizes to about 1% - to  determine the exact concentrations of the resulting ions, need to use  the acid-ionization constant or the equilibrium constant for the  ionization of the weak acid for a weak monoprotic acid, the general equation is HA(aq)  +  H2O(l)  <---->  H3O+(aq)  +  A-(aq) Kc  =  [H3O+][A-]/[HA][H2O]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
for a dilute solution and a weak acid, the [H2O] does not change, so  include this number (55.5 M) into Kc to give: Ka = Kc[H2O] = [H3O+][A-]/[HA] determining Ka is usually done experimentally, either by measuring  the conductivity of the solution or some other colligative property to  find the % ionization, or by measuring the pH of the solution which  would give the [H3O+] the degree ionization or percent ionization of a weak acid (or base) is  the fraction of the starting molecules that wind up as ions when  reacting with water example: nicotinic acid is a monoprotic acid, formula is HC6H4NO2 - a  0.012 M solution has a pH of 3.39 at 25 C - what is the acid ionization  constant, Ka, for this acid at 25 C? what is the degree of ionization for  this acid in this solution? recognize that when we say a solution is 0.012 M, that means we start  with this amount, of which some will ionize when added to water - so  can treat the ionization equilibrium as follows HNic(aq)  +  H2O(l)  <---->  H3O+(aq)  +  Nic-(aq) start 0.012 M 10-7 M (~0) 0 equil. 0.012 - x x x
Background image of page 2
so  Ka  =  (x)(x)/(0.012 -x) but at equilibrium, you know that the pH is 3.39 - therefore, the [H3O+]  = antilog of 3.39 = 4.07 X 10-4 M (notice 10-7 M is negligible compared  to 10-4 M) so Ka = (4.07 X 10-4)(4.07 X 10-4)/(0.012 - 0.000407) note 0.012 - 0.000407 ~  0.012 because of significant figures
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course CH 101 taught by Professor Wolfman during the Spring '08 term at BC.

Page1 / 29

Chapter 17 - Chapter 17 - Acid-Base Equilibria when you...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online