Chapter 18

Chapter 18 - precipitation reactions are common in natural...

Info iconThis preview shows pages 1–4. Sign up to view the full content.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
precipitation reactions are common in natural phenomena: limestone caves (calcium carbonate) kidney stones (calcium phosphate, calcium oxalate) questions to ask about these processes and other precipitation  reactions: how can you predict the solubility of a given salt? how much of one ion is needed to completely precipitate another  ion? how does the solubility of a salt depend on the pH of the  solution? so need to deal with the solution equilibria of slightly soluble or  nearly insoluble compounds by using the equilibrium constant when a freely soluble ionic compound is dissolved in water, there is  complete ionization to the individual ions – when a minimally soluble  ionic compound is “dissolved” in water, there is an equilibrium  between the undissolved solid and the ions in the saturated solution –  look at calcium oxalate as an example: CaC 2 O 4 (s)   --- Ca +2 (aq)  +  C 2 O 4 2- (aq) the equilibrium constant for this process is  Keq = [Ca +2 ][ C 2 O 4 2- ]/[ CaC 2 O 4 ]
Background image of page 1

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
but CaC 2 O 4   is a pure solid with a fixed concentration, so can  incorporate this value into Keq to come up with a new constant, Ksp,  which is defined as Ksp = [Ca +2 ][ C 2 O 4 2- ] this is called the solubility product constant of calcium oxalate, and is  the equilibrium constant for the solubility equilibrium of a slightly  soluble or nearly insoluble ionic compound like all equilibrium constants, the value of Ksp depends on the  temperature, but is independent of the concentrations of the ions at a  given T for the salt with the general formula A m B n : A m B n    ---    mA +n (aq)  +  nB -m (aq) Ksp = [A +n ] m [B -m ] n so for a slightly soluble salt like lead iodide, PbI 2    PbI 2 (s)   --   Pb +2 (aq)  +  2I - (aq) Ksp  =  [Pb +2 ][I - ] 2
Background image of page 2
the concentrations of the ions define the molar solubility of the ionic  compound, which is the moles of the solid which can dissolve per  liter of solution to give a saturated solution example: a liter of a saturated solution of calcium oxalate, CaC 2 O 4 , at  25 C is evaporated to dryness leaving behind a 0.0061 g residue of  solid calcium oxalate. What is the solubility product constant for  calcium oxalate at 25 C? the data tells you the solubility of calcium oxalate is 0.0061 grams/liter  or 4.8 X 10 -5  M – based on the dissociation equation for calcium  oxalate CaC 2 O 4 (s)   -   Ca +2 (aq)  +   C 2 O 4 2- (aq) so for this saturated solution, for every mole of calcium oxalate, you  get the same number of moles of calcium ion and oxalate ion –  therefore, the [Ca +2 ] = [C 2 O 4 2- ]  =  4.8 X 10
Background image of page 3

Info iconThis preview has intentionally blurred sections. Sign up to view the full version.

View Full DocumentRight Arrow Icon
Image of page 4
This is the end of the preview. Sign up to access the rest of the document.

Page1 / 23

Chapter 18 - precipitation reactions are common in natural...

This preview shows document pages 1 - 4. Sign up to view the full document.

View Full Document Right Arrow Icon
Ask a homework question - tutors are online