Conditional statements

Conditional statements - Conditionals Conditionals are...

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Unformatted text preview: Conditionals Conditionals are propositions of the form if p, then q where p is called the antecedent and q is called the consequent. In a conditional the antecedent specifies a condition that is sufficient for the consequent. A condition is sufficient for the consequent if its being true is enough for the consequent to be true. For example: (1) If John is a brother , then John is male . True (2) If John is a male , then John is a brother False The antecedent is underlined in each of the above conditionals. In (1) the antecedent specifies a sufficient condition for the consequent (hence, (1) is true), but this is not the case with (2) (hence, (2) is false.). A conditional is false when the antecedent is true and the consequent is false (being male is not sufficient for being a brother, as there are many brotherless males). In all other cases, the conditional is true. Notice also that the consequent of conditionals that are true specifies a condition that is necessary for the antecedent. Notice also that the consequent of conditionals that are true specifies a condition that is necessary for the antecedent....
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course PHI 006 taught by Professor Sharpe during the Spring '08 term at Westmont.

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