PBHE 413 Exams - PBHE 413 Exams Exam 1 Erik Auf der Heide tells us that a common assumption is that\"good disaster response is merely an extension of

PBHE 413 Exams - PBHE 413 Exams Exam 1 Erik Auf der Heide...

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PBHE 413 Exams Exam 1 Erik Auf der Heide tells us that a common assumption is that "good disaster response is merely an extension of good routine, daily emergency procedures." He disagrees with this assumption. Others might argue that reserving emergency response protocols and equipment for use solely in disasters and mass casualty incidents is less effective than using them on a daily basis so that they are familiar during times of high stress. Which opinion is closest to your own? Give reasons for your answer, based on your readings and your own personal experiences. (Auf der Heide, Chapter 4, p. 3) Initially prior to beginning this class, I would have possibly thought the same thing, that if you practiced your craft, then once an emergency were to arise, then you would be prepared to manage such incidents. In my opinion, training can still be conducted for daily procedures; however, training and planning should also be incorporated into the plan prior to a disaster or mass casualty event. Such disasters present problems seldom confronted in every day crises. As opposed to most normal crises, disasters elicit the need for multi-authoritative and multi-disciplinary coordination amongst various agencies. This may be in the form of multiple coordination efforts between multiple fire departments; law enforcement agencies; hospitals; ambulances; military units; utility crews; and other organizations. Having the various entities working together requires that everyone use a single point of communicationto prevent confusion. Manning communications may also become a problem, because all of the pertinent information must be filtered out from insignificant information causing the system to become so overwhelmed causing confusion. In contrast, incidents that happen locally tend to involve the same set of emergency organizations; each is eventually able to carry out its tasks at the scene independently with ease. As a result, there are not many concerns for on-the-spot decisions about the responsibilities of each organization at the scene. Furthermore, certain disasters may create demands that exceed the capacities of single organizations, requiring them to share tasks and resources with other organizations that use unfamiliar procedures. Depending the type and the severity of the disaster, it may attract organizations or volunteers that otherwise would not respond to disasters. Disasters may generate a whole host of problems that are not found in routine emergencies. Organizations change structure, with various positions being filled by different persons. Multiple organizations are faced with overlapping areas of responsibility.Comment: You have given a good justification for your opinion. I'm glad to read that this course is causing you to think about these issues!
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