hep - Caty Farwick Anatomy and Physiology II Dr. Hageman...

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Caty Farwick Anatomy and Physiology II Dr. Hageman Hepatitis Hepatitis is described as injury to the liver characterized by the presence of inflammatory cells in the liver. The etymology of the word hepatitis means inflammation of the liver. Hepatitis has many forms there are 5 forms of the viral form of hepatitis, alcoholic hepatitis, and autoimmune. The signs and symptoms of hepatitis will also be discussed and ways contraction. The first type of viral hepatitis is Hepatitis A is transmitted via the fecal-oral route. This is a commonly known sexually transmitted disease. Hepatitis A only has an acute form. Symptoms include aches and pains, a general feeling of not being well, dark urine, diarrhea, fatigue, fever, intermittent, nausea and possibly vomiting, jaundice, which can make the sclera of a yellowish color, loss of appétit and pale feces. The incubation period is 28 days anywhere from 2 weeks to 6 months after being infected. Hepatitis A is transmitted with a household member or sex partner with Hepatitis A, contaminated food/water, eating raw or partially cooked contaminated shellfish, feces, infected food handlers by not washing with soap and water, and oral-fecal contact by touching contaminated items, food, etc. Although there is a vaccine, treatment includes an injection of immunoglobin after 2 weeks of exposure. The second type of viral hepatitis is Hepatitis B which is caused by hepadnavirus, which can cause both acute and chronic hepatitis. This type of hepatitis can cause both chronic and acute hepatitis. Forms of transmission of Hepatitis B include: blood, tattoos, sexually (through intercourse or through contact with blood or bodily fluids), or via a mother to child by breast
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course BIO 212 taught by Professor Hageman during the Spring '08 term at Thomas More KY.

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hep - Caty Farwick Anatomy and Physiology II Dr. Hageman...

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