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Agenda Setting and Spiral of Silence

Agenda Setting and Spiral of Silence - Cultivation Theory...

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Cultivation Theory
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Cultivation Theory Examines the link between TV consumption and perception of social reality
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Cultivation Theory TV dominates the symbolic environment of its audiences and give ppl false views of what reality is like TV “cultivates” or reinforces certain beliefs in its viewers (society is violent, there are no old ppl) TV has a powerful cumulative effect on users symbol sharing influences how we view the world
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Mainstreaming TV viewing can move heavy viewers towards a mainstream view/perception Example: Heavy TV viewers in the Northeast and South become more similar in their views Light viewers have very different views
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Resonance Effects of TV are greater when the content is consistent with the real-life situation of the viewer The impact of TV viewing is greater for those for whom the TV messages resonate
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Question Should anything be done to control violent entertainment content? Do you think media consumption really influences how you see the world? If yes, to what extent?
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Agenda Setting Theory McCombs and Shaw
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Agenda Setting Theory Explains the relationship btwn. How the media cover a story and the extent to which we think that story is important
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Shaw & McCombs (1977): "Here may lie the most important effect of mass communication, its ability to mentally order and organize our world for us. In short, the mass media may not be successful in telling us what to think, but they are stunningly successful in telling us what to think about."
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Assumptions: 1) The press and the media do not reflect reality; they filter and shape it 2) Media concentration on a few issues leads the public to perceive those issues as more important than other issues.
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