Chapters 4, 5, 6

Chapters 4, 5, 6 - Symbolic Interactionism George Herbert...

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Symbolic Interactionism George Herbert Mead
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“I am…” List 15 words that describe you
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“I am…” Nouns probably indicate who you are, your identity Adjectives reflect how we think about ourselves How did you start associating these words with yourself? How did communication play a role in the link between you and each word?
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Communication and You Self-concept Communication Affects how we communicate with ourselves and with others thoughts and emotions How to act with others
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“who we are—our identities—is built in our communicating. People come to each encounter with an identifiable ‘self,’ built through past interactions, and as we talk , we adapt ourselves to fit the topic we’re discussing and the people we’re talking with, and we are changed by what happens to us as we communicate” – John Stewart, 2003, p. 30 Symbolic Interactionism
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Meaning Meaning stems from both a social and an internal process During self-interaction we make “indications” to ourselves that help direct out actions
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Significant Others People whose opinions of us alter our own self-perceptions We learn how to view ourselves and our lives from our communication with others
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The perceptions of significant others allow us to label and name ourselves Chatham-Carpenter & DeFransisco, 1997: To be assertive Take risks Care for ourselves Believe that we are important
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God as “significant other” Self-esteem and faith Self-esteem as God- given Personal, loving relationship with God Knowing “who they were in God” Church support Chatham-Carpenter, 2006
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Self-esteem as God-given “Once you know the Lord and become God-centered, you don’t rely on other people for your self-esteem. You rely on the Lord for you self-esteem, and He gives it to you in all different ways”
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Self-esteem as God-given “My self-esteem has been the lowest when I have turned my focus from God to people and highest when I turned from people to God”
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This note was uploaded on 04/15/2008 for the course COM 200 taught by Professor Barrientos during the Spring '08 term at Pepperdine.

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Chapters 4, 5, 6 - Symbolic Interactionism George Herbert...

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