Comparison Dickenson and Thomas - Running head Death by Comparison 1 Death by Comparison Dickinson and Thomas ENG 125 Death by Comparison Dickinson to

Comparison Dickenson and Thomas - Running head Death by...

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Running head: Death by Comparison 1 Death by Comparison: Dickinson and Thomas ENG 125 July 27, 2014 Death by Comparison: Dickinson to Thomas
Death by Comparison 2 There has been nothing that has plagued the thinking of mankind like the process of death. We foresee death as the unsolved secret mystery, the final voyage, never to be done until one feels the completion of its act. Our overbearing fascination with the concept of death has carried into the forms of artists spanning from literature, to music (Metallica’s “Fade to Black” and Clapton’s “Tears in Heaven” (Wawzenek, 2014)) and art. Death is the uncertain. We all experienced death: seen death, faced it within our lifetime, but no one has comprehended about what happens when one dies. It’s the uncertainty that plagues us to wonder about the imagination that happens when one dies. It’s the rampant imagination that provokes poets to finding the bleak, the optimistic and the compassionate. It’s the unknown associated with death that drives the capability to cross into different mediums, societies and styles. There is no regards to how it is portrayed within your imagination of death; rather it is the last tender moment with a friend or the horrific meeting with the enemy…all ending the same way, death. Coming to terms with the idea of morality enhances imagination within artist. However, the content stays the same despite the difference and perceptions that are based around death. The obsession with death was displayed within the literature of the following two poets: Emily Dickinson and Dylan Thomas within our textbook (Clugston, 2010). Each came from a different background and different time. Emily Dickinson, who “inherited the Puritan traits of austerity, simplicity, and practicality, as well as an astute observation of the inner self,” (Morhall, 1975) could be no more different than the comparison poet within this paper, Dylan Thomas. “Thomas undeniably has become a cult, perhaps because his poetry as well as his life went to extremes in a way that people can recognize and admire,” (Ferris, 1977). To provide this paper justice, I believe there should be a comparison of just not their work, but of them as authors themselves. Even though they work with consistency of maintaining similarities between their
Death by Comparison 3 work with having the same style, content and form to their pieces, they are opposites in the aspect of their vision to how death is approached. The theme of death is so rampant within the literary world that the demur puritan and the wild, unabashed socialite both find solace with literary genuflection of its embrace and ideal. Within Thomas’ Do Not Go Gentle into that Good Night, and Dickinson’s Because I Could Not Stop for Death, you find death running unrestrained. Using their influence of style, content and form, they provide attributes to the theme of their individual pieces. Even when they seem to find common ground, they provide insight that differs greatly.

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