Antigone - Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the...

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Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the Enlightenment 11:00 – 12:15 P.M. Professor Chazan T.A. Menahem Antigone The tragedy of Antigone was like any other tragedy. The tragedy was inevitable and the deaths in it were bound to happen. I liked what the protagonist of the story, Antigone, did. She stood up for her family and her brother and tried to give him a peaceful place to lie after death. Even if Antigone died at the end of the play, it was right for her to stand up in what she believed in. The death of Antigone came on her own fault, by her own hanging and her death also caused the death of her lover, Haemon and Eurydice, the Queen. I think that Antigone didn’t feel a need to live anymore because there wasn’t anything in her life that made her happy and if she did live, there would just be more turmoil in her life. Antigone went through all this turmoil because she wanted to do something she felt was right. I see a lot of her in myself. If there was something that I wanted done, I
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This note was uploaded on 04/17/2008 for the course CONWEST 101 taught by Professor Arcilla during the Fall '08 term at NYU.

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Antigone - Conversations of the West: Antiquity and the...

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