Seated Buddha Amitabha

Seated Buddha Amitabha - originally used in a temple where...

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Mone 1 Trevor Mone Mr. J. Roberson Art History 270 November 29, 2007 Seated Buddha Amitabha Seated Buddha Amitabha is a perfect example of a Buddha in meditation. This work of art is seen by many people as the lord of the Western Paradise. The position of it’s’ hands are meant to show the form of meditation which it is doing. It was placed in a temple for meditation and honoring the Buddha. This is a piece from the Heian period who focused their attention on making buddhas in this style. As lord of the Western Paradise the Amitabha Buddha is shown to be one of the most powerful. This work symbolizes the connection between the spirits and the mortal world. This is seen through the circle which is supposed to be behind it and by the lotus blossom. It was
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Unformatted text preview: originally used in a temple where many people can come to show their devote worship to Buddha. Its hand position shows that it is in a meditation which symbolizes the connection it has between the human world and spirit world. The Heian placed the Seated Buddha Amitabha in a temple for several reasons. One is that people could go to show their faith to Buddha by going to it in order to meditate. It was also placed in a temple so people from other Asian beliefs could decide to convert to gain entry into the Western Paradise. Another reason is for people to see the glistening gold which shows the wealth and prosperity in religion that is associated with Buddhism. Mone 2...
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Seated Buddha Amitabha - originally used in a temple where...

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