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Poetry Explication Essay

Poetry Explication Essay - Drury 1 Summer Drury Professor...

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Drury 1 Summer Drury Professor Bailey Enc 1102 January 23, 2008 Poetry Explication Do not go gentle into that good night, Old age should burn and rave at close of day; Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Though wise men at their end know dark is right, Because their words had forked no lightning they Do not go gentle into that good night. Good me, the last wave by, crying how bright Their frail deeds might have danced in a greed bay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. Wild men who caught and sang the sun in flight, And learn, too late, they grieved it on its way, Do not go gentle into that good night. Grave men, near death, who see with blinding sight Blind eyes could blaze like meteors and be gay, Rage, rage against the dying of the light. And you, my father, there on the sad height, Curse, bless, me now with your fierce tears, I pray, Do not go gentle into that good night. Rage, rage against the dying of the light. “Do Not Go Gentle into That Good Night,” by Dylan Thomas describes how the narrator views death and the ways that men with unique personalities finally accept their fate. Thomas describes death and the path leading up to it using incredible examples of literary devices like metaphor, simile, and alliteration, using explicit connotation and denotation, and a very specific theme of death throughout. The form of the poem is called a villanelle, which uses a very distinct rhyme scheme that had not really been accomplished until Thomas published this poem. The first
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Drury 2 stanza sets the stage for the whole theme of the poem. The two main lines in the poem are first said in the first stanza and they are “do not go gentle into that good night,” and “rage, rage against the dying of the light” (Thomas 867). The middle four stanzas of the poem each describe four different types of men and how they lived their lives. Each of the four stanzas takes one type of man and describes his personality and how he lived his life. The last line of each stanza describes how they inevitably fight against death in the end. The last stanza ends with the author’s own personal experience of his father dying. The opening stanza of this poem sets the stage as to what will be discusses and described throughout the entire poem and breaks down the connotation of the main lines of the poem. The opening line of the poem does not immediately cause you to think about death, instead, you think that the poem will be a nice and peaceful one. Once you have read through the poem once, you
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