Journal 1 - Milgram's Study of Obedience I think that the...

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Milgram’s Study of Obedience I think that the subjects’ agreed to administer the shocks so willingly as the behavioral equivalent to the Nazis’. The Nazis’ just did as they were told regardless of how much they might not have agreed with it. Many of the subjects did the same thing. They may have paused long enough for their morals to kick in and tell them that what they were doing was wrong, but in the end they ended up behaving how the experimenter told them too. I believe Milgram’s research was ethical. Even though it made many subjects uncomfortable, no one really got hurt. The subjects only thought they were actually giving shocks to an actual human being. The subjects also had the chance to walk away whenever they felt like they had had enough. None of the researchers were forcing the subjects to stay, only egging them on enough to try to convince them to continue on with the experiment. This was, of course, the whole purpose of the study. To see if people would continue to follow the orders of an authority figure, even if they knew what they
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This note was uploaded on 04/18/2008 for the course PSY 2012 taught by Professor Jenkins during the Fall '07 term at Seminole CC.

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Journal 1 - Milgram's Study of Obedience I think that the...

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